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THURSDAY 02 OCTOBER 2014
You are here: Home Flight News East Africa School Of Aviation Does It Again In Aviation Training Management Courses In Kenya.
East Africa School Of Aviation Does It Again In Aviation Training Management Courses In Kenya. Print
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Bringing the world to Kenya for quality Aviation Studies and Certifications

DIRECTOR NYAGA: started in 1954the EASA is the training directorate of the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA), although we are semi-autonomous, meaning we are an organization within our affairs with a mission and a vision. EASA is ISO 9001:2008 Certified , just like KCAA, although with a different mandate , our mandate is to is to build capacity for the Aviation industry not only in Kenya but also in the region ,more so because ,beside being located in Kenya but also in the region ,more so because ,beside being located in Kenya , we train professionals for the regional countries such as Uganda, Tanzania , Rwanda and Burundi. We also cater for special training courses for students from Nigeria, Ghana, Sudan and Chad, because we have the capacity and the facilities required for those trainings in Air Traffic Control, Aviation Security (AVSEC) Navigation Aids training and Telecommunications Engineering (communication Engineering and Surveillance Training).

EASA is also accredited by IATA-meaning we also conduct IATA training for cabin crew.

Q: Good. Now since EASA target students from many African countries, who is your major competitor?

A: For professional training, we do not have a competitor; however, we do have completion coming from as far away as Cairo in Egypt and South African schools. The other completion comes from West African schools. Which teach in French?

Q : Citing South Africa and Egypt as your major competitors , what are the main areas that bring about competition –is it the courses offered , is it the opportunities available after training . is it the element of cost of training?

A : Most of our completion comes from the regional market initially, we trained students from Angola ,Botswana and Namibia for quite a number of years but ,for some reason. Students from this countries opted to revert to training in South Africa. However, of late we are seeing a new trend where the same students are coming back to train in Kenya, so, in my view the issue of competition is all about once options, not because of cost opportunity and so forth. Recently, we admitted students from Cameroon and Nigeria who had also trained in both South Africa and Egypt and their main response to our marketing team was that they preferred Kenya because we are cheaper Cairo’s main challenge is language and Southafrica may have a cost issue, but I believe we are leading in terms of quality of training. Especially with the current facilities we have. In Kenya, for instance there are some private schools that offer same courses, but the issue of certification of such institution is a challenge for them and their students. However the issue of cost comes in because most of these private schools charge high fees for their courses. Most of the old pilots of Kenya are graduates of the Soroti school of Aviation in Uganda.

Q: Has EASA established training institutions in other countries?

A: Our main courses are taught right here in Kenya, but we know some courses like Air Traffic Control and communication Aviation Surveillance are offered in Tanzania ,our closest neighbor . But we encourage English –speaking students to take their courses from here because of the advantage of the facilities around here. In the first East African Community arrangement, Uganda was to train pilots and aeronautical engineers, Kenya was to teach the air traffic controllers and telecommunications maintenance engineers and Tanzania was to train staff for administration in Arusha. However after the split, Tanzania established the training of controllers and navigational aids maintenance engineers, Uganda trained their old role of training pilots and Kenya went full swing into training for all areas.

Q: Does the collage intend to venture into training of pilots?

A: Well, our main focus is on training ground and cabin crew, but, in our strategic plan, we have in place plans to establish a pilot training school.

Q: Training comes at a cost, kindly comment on this.

A: {Chuckling}….well, just like the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority services, ours are more of a cost recovery than a profit-motivated business.navigational aids maintenence nya was to teach t

This means that most of our courses are affordable except for air traffic control causes –like piloting, they are very expensive. The solution for that in Kenya for instance, is that most of the staff training in expensive causes is sponsored directly by the KCAA, because they are the ones who finally employ them locally. Most of the foreign students here pursuing Air traffic Control certification are sponsored by their respective civil aviation authorities. One of the disadvantages of self sponsorship in such courses is that the question of “Where are you going to work?” arises because the service of air traffic control is invariably provided by the state under the civil aviation authorities.

Q: What opportunities are available for your students once they graduate, are they readily absorbed into the job market?

A: It all depends on the categories of students upon successful completion of the courses and exams. Just like the air traffic controllers who are absorbed by the respective state, we need to acknowledge that students studying the other courses graduate to fill in a shortage of staff in their fields. For in stance currently Kenya has a shortage of ground operating crew in charge of various airport processes such as maintenance and navigation. In fact most of the Kenyan student training with us are sponsored by the KCAA, thus opportunities are available before and after training because a large number of them are already on the KCAA payroll. We have not trained privately sponsored telecommunications engineers, for example but for those students who are fresh from high school and are self sponsored taking abinitio training, they start by following a more academic line. They study aeronautical engineering and sit the Kenya National Examinations Council (KNEC) Examinations just like students who train at the polytechnic s. These are the ones who job seeks for them, but a few exceptional ones are readily absorbed by the industry because there is a shortage which needs to be filled, as a requirement, by experienced and qualified persons. The job seekers will usually end in the airlines, especially in the Middle East, as maintenance engineers.

Q: What is the fate of self –sponsored students who study academic courses and later pursue aviation courses?

A: These who sit are certified by KNEC and are absorbed into the industry have to sit a mandatory exam set by the KCAA so that they can be licensed to practice their trade using our standards .others will opt to practice as independent technicians –that is okay –but they have to have a KCAA license to allow them to work in Kenya.

Q: Does the school offer other courses that are not directly related to aviation?

A: Apart from the many aviation courses which I have highlighted, we also have business

courses offered in the institution. We have a partnership with Mol University. Who offer a Business Management /Aviation option and the certification offered are at a diploma, under –graduate degree and Master’s degree level.

Q: Does that provide an opportunity for offering scholarships to qualified students in that are of study?

A: Well the civil aviation authorities may choose to sponsor students pursuing either the under graduate degree or Masters degree or student may be sponsored by their respective employers, but currently, we have not started a scholarship program for this course.

Q: Would you say that the collage has fully explored the training needs of the region or are the challenges in meeting that end?

A: Most of the recommendations for training locations come from ICAO; therefore we are just one of the many global institutions certified by ICAO to teach students from many countries especially in Africa, we train in about 20 countries in various fields. In areas such as aviation security we even go beyond

training African students because we conform to the training standards set by international Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO) we have trained students from Europe and Asia, specially Switzerland, Afghanistan and Malaysia, meaning we are global in the case of Africa we have a firm grip on training opportunities. We have departed from going showcase in both local and international shows and exhibition and will now start going to schools so as to promote ab initio /aviation academic training for cabin crew and aeronautical engineering. We are currently working with Alliance Boys High School and there is an association that schools interested in aviation training have formed which works closely with KCAA to make learning easy and practical.

Q: Touching on technology, how does the collage tailor its courses to meet current global standard of technology?

A: Since we are certified to teach ICAO –recommended courses such as security, all our training, include the equipment and content is passed by ICAO.Right now there is security training going on here with a British Aviation company and about two weeks ago, we trained with the US who give us latest technology via collaboration with the Federation Aviation Authority (FAA), so we are always on top of things global. That is why we are ISO –accredited and all our certificates bear the ICAO logo for AVSEC. We are introducing a new course to facilitate training of aircraft technicians who are already in the field but are not licensed. The curriculum and syllabus are ready for rollout and we are launching soon for as to fast –track the licensing of air craft maintenance crew. In the next five years we shall be establishing –e- learning for most of our courses where practical learning is not really that mandatory. From April 12, 2012 we shall launch an association to cater for our trainees s well as an Aviation Curriculum Development Centre which shall be coordinated by ICAO .We already have students undergoing the process of developing a standardized training package that should be certified and presented by the secretary General of ICAO during that launch.

Q: Does EASA conduct joint training with the Kenya Air force?

A: We train the military air traffic controllers currently we have a class going on with Rwandese students and among them our four Kenya Air force students. They are here because four students cannot form a quorum enough for a training session. When we have search –and –rescue training, we invite the officers to join us.

Q: Does the collage have a course on training of trainers, where your professional lecturers can train trainers who can then offer their services beyond our borders, perhaps?

A: Yes we do, For instance for the flight Safety inspectors, we collaborate with the FAA or with ICAO So that we can have the training –of- trainer’s right here. We also train regional field trainers here.

Q: In the past five years, there has been rise in the number of aviation accident in Africa could they be related to training lapses that perhaps fall to overcome actual accident scenarios?

A: Well, I don’t think so. Our procedures are defined very well, but someone could cause a non-training –related lapse when on the job .Usually, the person may have rarely used a technique, thus the possibility of getting it is possible. However, if it is identified that there is a lapse in school courses or training methods, we recommend refresher courses for students or fix the lapse in the course content,

Which is very rare. This also takes care of new technologies which heat the industry. All our refresher courses incorporate new technologies and strategies, especially in safety managements system.

Q: Kenya, the region and the rest of the world want to know more about you. Besides having outreach of schools what more are you doing to ensure that EASA becomes a household name?

A: Incidentally, our collage has not focused only on Kenya but on the region as a whole. Well, not many Kenyans would tell you about EASA, say, school-leavers telling you that is their choice for aviation education. This is because the main aim of forming the school was to deal with the CAA‘s and larger aviation entities in need of the professionals training. But right now apart from encouraging young students from high school, we are attending educational fares exhibition and the annual Agricultural society of Kenya shows across the country.

Where we have a stand and we are developing plans to reach h out to the countries, especially now that the national high school results have just been released and student who want to do aviation courses will have a chance of knowing who we are and not opting to go to South Africa or Egypt . However we also have limitations in terms of infrastructure, like the size of classes, the laboratories, the library and the equipment. Some courses are very intensive, thus we can not have a class of 50 students yet, as their level of concentration will be impaired. The equipment is also very expensive and only a limited number of students can use it at any one time. Therefore, we are trying as much as we are telling the world to come and study aviation at EASA, let the students come and find it convenient to study here too.

Q: Since most of your courses are very marketable in the region, have you considered network marketing as a mouthpiece for the collage?

A: We already know that our students are very marketable out there, thus beyond working with our system for marketing, we shall also use network marketing to drive out outreach agenda. For instance many people in the industry know EASA for producing competent graduates who never lack jobs out there and that alone is a good platform for marketing the school. The fact that this is a government institution that is stable and offers quality training makes networking easy, because people want to associate themselves with the quality service. It is always fulfilling to walk around Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and other Airports in the world and hear the voice of a senior ground crew or cabin crew officer calling out your name, that means they were here with us and appreciate our training.

Q: What procedures must one undergo to secure a license from the school?

A: Good question. We have two groups of persons that we award Aircraft maintenance License (AML) to. The first group consists of aviation diploma holders who do not have the required experience to qualify them to sit our exams. For these ones, we arrange a months training and six-month attachment in the local industry after which they qualify to sit license exams. For the second group, they are already working and have certification but luck a practice license here. Here we approach the respective employers and request them to release the person from duty for four hours a day for eight months , during which we prepare these busy students for the intensive course. Both groups will finally sit the exams together.

With the rapid growth of aviation industry in Africa, it has been established besides the pilots training courses there is need to introduce courses in aviation management such as diplomas in flight operations  & dispatch, aircraft engineering,air traffic controllers, aviation safety & security courses,bachelor degrees and masters degree in aviation management to be able to meet the needed skills in aviation industry.We have schools like East Africa of Aviation Kenya and Soroti flying schools which do provide aviation courses both flying ,engineering and management and this also enables potential students within East Africa region to be able to train within the region without having to go a broad.

Anthony Juma is the Editor and Senior Aviation Director at Wings Over Africa Aviation. <br><a href='http://www.wingsoverafrica-aviation.com’> This is an Air Charter Company that specializes on Air News on Aviation Training courses At East Africa School Of Aviation |Pilot Training Schools East Africa| Air Charter Services In Kenya,Uganda,Tanzania,East Africa & Africa. </a> The website has guided thousands of travelers to achieve their dream holiday. For more information and guidance, visit the site at http:// / www.wingsoverafrica-aviation.com/index.php/services/consultancy.html l </a>

 

 

 

y the industry because their is olitechnic red s airport proseses r traffic controller

 

training African students because we conform to the training standards set by international Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO) we have trained students from Europe and Asia, specially Switzerland, Afghanistan and Malaysia, meaning we are global in the case of Africa we have a firm grip on training opportunities. We have departed from going showcase in both local and international shows and exhibition and will now start going to schools so as to promote ab initio /aviation academic training for cabin crew and aeronautical engineering. We are currently working with Alliance Boys High School and there is an association that schools interested in aviation training have formed which works closely with KCAA to make learning easy and practical.

Q: Touching on technology, how does the collage tailor its courses to meet current global standard of technology?

A: Since we are certified to teach ICAO –recommended courses such as security, all our training, include the equipment and content is passed by ICAO.Right now there is security training going on here with a British Aviation company and about two weeks ago, we trained with the US who give us latest technology via collaboration with the Federation Aviation Authority (FAA), so we are always on top of things global. That is why we are ISO –accredited and all our certificates bear the ICAO logo for AVSEC. We are introducing a new course to facilitate training of aircraft technicians who are already in the field but are not licensed. The curriculum and syllabus are ready for rollout and we are launching soon for as to fast –track the licensing of air craft maintenance crew. In the next five years we shall be establishing –e- learning for most of our courses where practical learning is not really that mandatory. From April 12, 2012 we shall launch an association to cater for our trainees s well as an Aviation Curriculum Development Centre which shall be coordinated by ICAO .We already have students undergoing the process of developing a standardized training package that should be certified and presented by the secretary General of ICAO during that launch.

Q: Does EASA conduct joint training with the Kenya Air force?

A: We train the military air traffic controllers currently we have a class going on with Rwandese students and among them our four Kenya Air force students. They are here because four students cannot form a quorum enough for a training session. When we have search –and –rescue training, we invite the officers to join us.

Q: Does the collage have a course on training of trainers, where your professional lecturers can train trainers who can then offer their services beyond our borders, perhaps?

A: Yes we do, For instance for the flight Safety inspectors, we collaborate with the FAA or with ICAO So that we can have the training –of- trainer’s right here. We also train regional field trainers here.

Q: In the past five years, there has been rise in the number of aviation accident in Africa could they be related to training lapses that perhaps fall to overcome actual accident scenarios?

A: Well, I don’t think so. Our procedures are defined very well, but someone could cause a non-training –related lapse when on the job .Usually, the person may have rarely used a technique, thus the possibility of getting it is possible. However, if it is identified that there is a lapse in school courses or training methods, we recommend refresher courses for students or fix the lapse in the course content,

Which is very rare. This also takes care of new technologies which heat the industry. All our refresher courses incorporate new technologies and strategies, especially in safety managements system.

Q: Kenya, the region and the rest of the world want to know more about you. Besides having outreach of schools what more are you doing to ensure that EASA becomes a household name?

A: Incidentally, our collage has not focused only on Kenya but on the region as a whole. Well, not many Kenyans would tell you about EASA, say, school-leavers telling you that is their choice for aviation education. This is because the main aim of forming the school was to deal with the CAA‘s and larger aviation entities in need of the professionals training. But right now apart from encouraging young students from high school, we are attending educational fares exhibition and the annual Agricultural society of Kenya shows across the country.

Where we have a stand and we are developing plans to reach h out to the countries, especially now that the national high school results have just been released and student who want to do aviation courses will have a chance of knowing who we are and not opting to go to South Africa or Egypt . However we also have limitations in terms of infrastructure, like the size of classes, the laboratories, the library and the equipment. Some courses are very intensive, thus we can not have a class of 50 students yet, as their level of concentration will be impaired. The equipment is also very expensive and only a limited number of students can use it at any one time. Therefore, we are trying as much as we are telling the world to come and study aviation at EASA, let the students come and find it convenient to study here too.

Q: Since most of your courses are very marketable in the region, have you considered network marketing as a mouthpiece for the collage?

A: We already know that our students are very marketable out there, thus beyond working with our system for marketing, we shall also use network marketing to drive out outreach agenda. For instance many people in the industry know EASA for producing competent graduates who never lack jobs out there and that alone is a good platform for marketing the school. The fact that this is a government institution that is stable and offers quality training makes networking easy, because people want to associate themselves with the quality service. It is always fulfilling to walk around Jomo Kenyatta International Airport and other Airports in the world and hear the voice of a senior ground crew or cabin crew officer calling out your name, that means they were here with us and appreciate our training.

Q: What procedures must one undergo to secure a license from the school?

A: Good question. We have two groups of persons that we award Aircraft maintenance License (AML) to. The first group consists of aviation diploma holders who do not have the required experience to qualify them to sit our exams. For these ones, we arrange a months training and six-month attachment in the local industry after which they qualify to sit license exams. For the second group, they are already working and have certification but luck a practice license here. Here we approach the respective employers and request them to release the person from duty for four hours a day for eight months , during which we prepare these busy students for the intensive course. Both groups will finally sit the exams together.

 

Summary

With the rapid growth of aviation industry in Africa, it has been established besides the pilots training courses there is need to introduce courses in aviation management such as diplomas in flight operations & dispatch, aircraft engineering,air traffic controllers, aviation safety & security courses,bachelor degrees and masters degree in aviation management to be able to meet the needed skills in aviation industry.We have schools like East Africa of Aviation Kenya and Soroti flying schools which do provide aviation courses both flying ,engineering and management and this also enables potential students within East Africa region to be able to train within the region without having to go a broad.

Anthony Juma is the Editor and Senior Aviation Director at Wings Over Africa Aviation. <br><a href='http://www.wingsoverafrica-aviation.com’> This is an Air Charter Company that specializes on Air News on Aviation Training courses At East Africa School Of Aviation |Pilot Training Schools East Africa| Air Charter Services In Kenya,Uganda,Tanzania,East Africa & Africa. </a> The website has guided thousands of travelers to achieve their dream holiday. For more information and guidance, visit the site at http:// / www.wingsoverafrica-aviation.com/index.php/services/consultancy.html l </a>

 

 

 

y the industry because their is olitechnic red s airport proseses r traffic controller